My album is taking shape more quickly now than it has in the six months I've been working on it.  Over the weekend, I finished principle recording sessions for all of the songs.  That leaves 2 more songs that need bass tracks from the talented Jonathan Ahrens, and 4 more tracks to be mixed by the equally on-point Igor Stolarsky.   Then the full 10 tracks will be mastered...and then it's time to focus on the artwork, and to start planning the release.  This independent musician thing is no joke.  But I've never been more proud of a project before... Pretty soon, I can stop talking about a new album, and start harping on you to actually listen to, and buy, it.

Ahh...soon.

42 The Doors - The Doors

042: The Doors – The Doors (1967)

It's funny the synchronicity of this list.  Last week, I listened to and read about Patti Smith--who had two songs on Horses that were in part about Jim Morrison.  Next week, I'll be listening to Love--a band whose lead singer, Arthur Lee, was responsible for getting an A&R guy to stick around and give The Doors a chance, which ultimately led to their record deal.

I have to admit that I wasn't really looking forward to either of this week's albums.  Here, once again, the rule of three listens proved itself.

During the first listen, I was distracted by the organs.  I haven't historically loved the sound of organs.  Perhaps it's a psychological reflex to my churchy upbringing.  My feelings about organ sounds has changed in the past year or so--I actually use organ sounds on several of my songs on the new album.  But, on this record, the organs are very much out front at times.  That was unsettling to me.

Another cool detail I learned from watching the Classic Albums episode about this album is that Jim Morrison was a huge fan of Frank Sinatra's.  It's one of those things that once you know, makes complete sense--but I don't know if I would have made that connection.

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Jim's crooner vibes are especially evident on songs like The Crystal Ship (which features a wonderfully infectious melody) as well as End Of The Night.

By the second listen, I was taking in the musicianship of this very talented band.  It's one of those rare examples of a band where each member is at the peak of their craft, and bring very different and complimentary styles to the table.  The classic rock grooves mixed with the psychedelia and latin beats, all underlaying a Floridian poet's ground-breaking lyrics.

By the third, I was convinced.  This was most true walking through Washington Square Park while listening to The End.  This spaced out, swirly, dreamscape of a song is Epic.  This song alone makes the album for me.

Break On Through (To The Other Side) is a song I'd heard many times prior to this week.  Listening to it in this context though, kicking off this album, I was really impressed with the tightness of the band.  I especially love the bass slide that spices up almost every bar of the verses.  It's so simple, but sweet.

I can't hear that intro organ to Soul Kitchen without thinking of Smash Mouth's Walking On The Sun...maybe it's just me.  Conversely, the organ intro to Light My Fire is perfect.   See, I can be open-minded about organs [editor's comment: omitted "that's what she said"].

Songs like Twentieth Century Fox and Back Door Man lack subtlety.  Though I don't think the Lizard King was going for subtle.

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41 Never Mind The Bollocks Here's The Sex Pistols

041: The Sex Pistols – Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols (1977)

I also watched the Classic Albums episode of this album.

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I have mentioned before that I don't love punk.  And the same goes for this album.

I listened three times.

I don't get it.

I can't think of a time I would ever think, oh, now's the perfect moment for some Sex Pistols (as great a band name as that is).

It makes me question why an album like this is up there with the greatest albums of all time.  Punk is the would-be soundtrack to the bratty and dangerous shit I did in my rebellious teen years.  If I had to create a defining list of the best moments of my life, I guess I would have to mention my punk moments...but were they really the best moments?  Are The Sex Pistols and The Clash up there with the Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Joni Mitchell, and Sly & The Family Stone?  For me, the answer is no.

I'm not saying I'm right, or that punk is shit.  It's just not anywhere on my list.  Working through this list has allowed me to now honestly declare that.

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Verdict

I wasn't really looking forward to either album this week--even though I'd never listened to either before.  The Doors changed my mind to a large degree, yet I wasn't completely won over to a point where I would need to add this to my collection.

I'm glad I listened to Never Mind The Bollocks...and I'm glad I never have to, ever again.

Up Next

040: Love – Forever Changes (1967)
039: The Beatles – Please Please Me (1963)

Want to listen ahead, or see some posts you may have missed? Check out the full list of the 100 Greatest Albums here.

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